See all Physiotherapy Clinics in The Rocks

The Sarah Key Physiotherapy Centre

The Sarah Key Physiotherapy Centre

Show Phone Number44 Bridge Street, Sydney, NSW 2000Australia
3.1 / 5  Good
from 5 users
WhatClinic ServiceScore™
Filters cached at 2018/08/21 10:04:55

Opening Hours

Please contact clinic for their opening hours
Enquire for a fast quote from The Sarah Key Physiotherapy Centre.

Popular Treatments

Physiotherapist Consultation
Back Pain Treatment
Spinal Rehabilitation - Neck and Back Injury
Spinal Manipulation
Posture Management
Chronic Pain Syndrome
See all treatments & prices

About The Sarah Key Physiotherapy Centre

Bridge Street in Sydney, Australia is the location of the clinic of this expert physiotherapist where patients are treated for a range of painful conditions and injuries. An initial consultation scheduled that lasts for about 90 minutes and the condition of patients are accurately assessed. All follow up treatments after the initial consultations are in sessions that last about 30 minutes. The team is particularly adept at treating chronic and acute back pain and in reducing pain within a week. Services provided include manual physiotherapy, exercise therapy, Iyengar Yoga and Pilates.

read more

Provides

Physiotherapy

Physiotherapy

 
Chronic Pain Syndrome
 
Physiotherapist Consultation
 
Posture Management
 
Spinal Rehabilitation - Neck and Back Injury

Chiropractic

 
Back Pain Treatment
 
Spinal Manipulation

Payment Information

Insurance

Private Patients Welcome

Ms SARAH KEY

Job Title:
  Physiotherapist
Biography:

I have long been interested in problem backs. In my childhood I recall my mother suffering from crippling migraine headaches and trying all sorts of cures. She saw a myriad different people who changed her diet and gave her drastic medicaments, but nothing made her better. Eventually she took herself off to an osteopath who manipulated her neck and fixed her in two visits! Even as a schoolgirl I remember being struck by this and astonished that the medical profession, so revered by us all, could have been so inept.

Much as I was impressed by the osteopaths, I didnt want to be one of them. I preferred the safer, respectability of medicine. Some of the claims made by osteopaths sat badly with me and I opted for the more evidence-based - though no less gratifying - mission of dealing with back problems through conventional diagnostics and also using my hands.

I started my learning odyssey in London in my early twenties. There were many places offering work, because all the teaching hospitals were crying out for staff, so it was easy to immerse myself in the sea of suffering patients and modestly do my best; the book open at the right page. Quite quickly I acquired a reputation fordealing with backs in the Harley Street area of London. At at the age of twenty-six I was known as the baby of the street.

There were few physios in London working solely on backs and before long the place was bursting at the seams, running nearly twelve hours a day and sometimes with cars double and treble parked outside. In those days I think I perhaps I wasnt doing especially clever work, so much as tinkering with my hands and listening. But at least I had time and I was doing something ‘hands on’; using human touch to probe about in the spinal links. A far better option, even then, than seeing people acquiescing to ‘living with their pain’, taking pills, lying down or worse still, at a days notice submitting like lambs to slaughter to the surgical table.

Early on it seemed to me the notion of a slipped disc’ was a furphy. Almost every patient referred to me came with the provisional diagnosis of PID (prolapsed intervertebral disc) and I couldnt understand how this could be so, especially if they responded well to my fairly artless tinkering. (A true slipped disc is impossible to fix with the hands.) The broad body of medicine remained obdurate, both the diagnostic world of radiology and the clinicians themselves. Everybody kept talking about disc prolapse and removing them willy nilly, and for years I simply carried my confusion around with me, fixing backs as I could and not talking much about what I was doing.

Over the years, I have moved further and further away from the narrow view of what goes wrong with spines. I became mistrustful of the readily expressed view ‘if you can’t see it there’s nothing wrong’. But rather than engage with the medical community [perhaps a mistake] I wrote my first book ‘Back in Action’ in 1986. I shut my ears to deafening clamour of dissent and wrote it as answers to commonly asked questions. My patients gave me the confidence to keep going and I directed my energies to them, rather than fellow practitioners. Not least amongst my supporters were members of the British royal family who were well known to look wider than the conservative view of health and ministering. His Royal Highness the Prince of Wales in particular urged me to continue.

Show Phone Number44 Bridge Street, Sydney, NSW 2000Australia